Month: February 2013

SQL Azure Error: Tables without a clustered index are not supported in this version of SQL Server

Home | Azure | SQL Azure Error: Tables without a clustered index are not supported in this version of SQL Server

I was trying to execute the following SQL Query in SQL Azure and got this error

Msg 40054, Level 16, State 1, Line 2

Tables without a clustered index are not supported in this version of SQL Server. Please create a clustered index and try again”

/****** Object:  Table [dbo].[Department]    Script Date: 2/18/2013 9:42:19 PM ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Department](
    [DepartmentID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [DepartmentName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [DepartmentCode] [char](5) NOT NULL,

 CONSTRAINT [PK_Department] PRIMARY KEY 
(
    [DepartmentId] ASC
)WITH (STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF)

)


GO
/****** Object:  Table [dbo].[Employee]    Script Date: 2/18/2013 9:42:19 PM ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Employee](
    [EmpID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [EmpName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [EmpAge] [int] NOT NULL,
    [EmpExperience] [decimal](5, 2) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Employee] PRIMARY KEY
(
    [EmpID] ASC
)WITH (STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF)
)

I’ve learn that the SQL Azure does not support tables that are without clustered Index. The fix for this is to tweak the above SQL Query to included clustered index.

/****** Object:  Table [dbo].[Department]    Script Date: 2/18/2013 9:42:19 PM ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Department](
    [DepartmentID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [DepartmentName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [DepartmentCode] [char](5) NOT NULL,

 CONSTRAINT [PK_Department] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [DepartmentId] ASC
)WITH (STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF)

)


GO
/****** Object:  Table [dbo].[Employee]    Script Date: 2/18/2013 9:42:19 PM ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Employee](
    [EmpID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [EmpName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [EmpAge] [int] NOT NULL,
    [EmpExperience] [decimal](5, 2) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Employee] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [EmpID] ASC
)WITH (STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF)
)

The above changes highlighted in yellow has  solved my issue of “

Msg 40054, Level 16, State 1, Line 2

Tables without a clustered index are not supported in this version of SQL Server. Please create a clustered index and try again”"

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Moving a SQL Server 2008 Database from on-premise to SQL Azure

Home | Azure | Moving a SQL Server 2008 Database from on-premise to SQL Azure

These days I’m doing lot of proof-of-concepts around the SharePoint 2013 App Model and how an ASP.NET MVC 3 application can be consumed/integrated in the SharePoint 2013 with the help of the App Model. As a first-step, I was trying to migrate a SQL 2008 database of an ASP.NET MVC3 application to Windows Azure. When it comes to migrating the database to Azure, there are multiple options available :-

a)Generate Insert SQL Scripts (compatible for SQL Azure) using ‘Tasks —> Generate Scripts’ in SQL Management Studio

b)Directly deploy the on-premise database to SQL Azure ‘Tasks’ —> Deploy Database to SQL Azure

c)Generate .dacpac export of SQL data + Schema and import it in SQL Azure

Since my database schema is not complex and data is also very less, I’m leveraging the 1’st approach.

Right-click on SQL database — > Tasks –> Generate Scripts

image

Select the list of tables to be migrated

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Advanced Settings –>

Select ‘Sql Azure Database’ for Database Engine Type and ‘Schema and data’ for Types of data to script.

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Select the location to save generated ‘.sql’file

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You’ll see successful creation of .sql files

image

Log in to Windows Azure Management Portal and create new instance of SQL

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Specify SQL Access Account

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Select ‘Manage’ option for SQL Server and open a new Query window

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Click ‘Run’. Now you are all set.